Whether this is your first or third OVI charge, it’s important to know what is involved. In today’s blog post, we will tell you everything you need to know about OVI charges. If you are facing an OVI charge in Athens, Ohio, contact Susan Gwinn Attorney at Law for legal representation.

What is an OVI?

In Ohio, an OVI stands for Operating a Vehicle Impaired. For a long time, an OVI was commonly known as a DUI, OMVI, or DWI. However, the difference of an OVI is that it doesn’t require “driving” or that the “operation” be in a “motor vehicle.” 

How Can You Be Charged With an OVI?

You can be charged with an OVI if your blood alcohol content while operating a vehicle is .08% or greater, you’re operating a vehicle under any controlled substance – alcohol or a combination of several substances – and if you’re operating a vehicle with a certain concentration of specified controlled substances.

This will depend on the OVI conviction. This can involve jail time, between three days to one year, as well as high fines and license suspensions. No matter what you’re being charged with, contact Susan Gwinn Law for legal representation.

 


What Can You Be Charged With for a Low-Tier Conviction?

This will depend on the OVI conviction. This can involve jail time, between three days to one year, as well as high fines and license suspensions. No matter what you’re being charged with, contact Susan Gwinn Law for legal representation.


What Is Involved in a High Test or Aggravated OVI?

This can involve jail time, a driver’s intervention program or house arrest with monitoring under the Community Control Sanction. Similar to the low-tier conviction, the charges will vary upon your specific situation. 

If you are arrested for DUI in Ohio, it is important to contact an experienced DUI lawyer right away. Susan Gwinn Attorney at Law will fight hard to protect your rights and get the best possible outcome in your case. Schedule a consultation with Susan Gwinn today.